Spring nano-bio mini-symposium set for April 3

Catch up on the latest research happening in Johns Hopkins University labs working in nanobiotechnology, the physics of cancer and cancer nanotech at INBT’s spring mini-symposium Wednesday, April 3 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Leverings’s Great Hall on the Homewood campus.

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Mini-symposiums are organized in the spring and fall by student leaders in the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, the Engineering in Oncology Center and the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. They are a means of showcasing current work, learning from guest speakers and facilitating communication and collaboration among affiliated laboratories. This event is open to the entire Johns Hopkins Community. Save the date!

The agenda is as follows:

  • 9:00 am ~ 9:10 am Welcome speech Denis Wirtz, PhD, Director of Johns Hopkins Physical Science Oncology Center (PS-OC)
  • 9:10 am ~ 9:40 am “Role of ion channels and aquaporins in cancer cell migration in confined microenvironments” Kimberly M. Stroka, PhD, Postdoc fellow (PS-OC) Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
  • 9:40 am ~ 10:10 am “TBD” Helena Zec, Graduate student (CCNE) Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
  • 10:10 am ~ 10:40 am “Single-cell protein profiling to study cancer cell heterogeneity” Jonathan Chen, Graduate student (PS-OC) Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yale University
  • 10:40 am ~ 11:30 am “Synthetic cell biology: total synthesis of cellular functions” Takanari Inoue, PhD, Assistant professor Department of Cell Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 11:30 am ~ 11:40 am Coffee Break
  • 11:40 am ~ 12:10 pm “TBD” Yu-Ja Huang, Graduate student (PS-OC) Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Johns Hopkins University
  • 12:10 pm ~ 1:00 pm “Infections, Chronic Inflammation, and Prostate Cancer” Karen Sandell Sfanos, PhD, Assistant professor Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
  • 1:00 pm ~ 1:30 pm “Development of CEST liposomes for monitoring nanoparticle-based cancer therapies using MRI” Tao Yu, Graduate student (CCNE) Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University

INBT Spring mini-symposium flyer

Self-assembling drug molecules could fight cancer

A popular method of targeted drug delivery for anti-cancer drugs involves doping another material with the desired pharmaceutical to obtain better targeting efficiency to tumor sites. The problem with this method, researchers have discovered, is that the quantity of drug payload per delivery unit can vary widely and that the materials used for delivery can have toxic side effects.

But what if you could turn the drug molecule itself into a nanoscale delivery system, cutting out the middleman completely?

TEM image of nanotubes formed by self-assembly of an anticancer drug amphiphile. These nanotubes possess a fixed drug loading of 38% (w/w). Image from Cui Lab.

TEM image of nanotubes formed by self-assembly of an anticancer drug amphiphile. These nanotubes possess a fixed drug loading of 38% (w/w). Image from Cui Lab.

Using the process of molecular self-assembly, that is what Honggang Cui, an assistant professor in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University, is attempting to do. His efforts have netted him the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award from the National Science Foundation. Cui, an affiliated faculty member of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, will receive the $500,000 award over five years.

Cui explained that a current method of delivering anti-cancer drugs is to enclose them in a nanoscale carrier made of natural or synthetic materials, but this method presents several challenges. “The amount of drug loaded per carrier is very much limited and varies from batch to batch. Even in the same batch, there is a drug loading variation from carrier to carrier. Additionally, the carrier material itself may have toxic side effects,” he said.

Cui’s research seeks to eliminate the need for the carrier by coaxing the drug molecules themselves to form their own carrier through the process of self-assembly. His team is developing new molecular engineering strategies to assemble anti-cancer drugs into supramolecular nanostructures.

“Such supramolecules could carry as much as 100 percent of the drug, would possess a fixed amount of drug per nanostructure and would minimize the potential toxicity of the carrier,” Cui said.

To learn more about research in the Cui lab go to http://www.jhu.edu/cui/

 

Nanotech checks on transplanted cell survival

Researchers at Johns Hopkins are using nanotechnology to track the survival and location of transplanted cells. The device, based on nanoscale ph sensors and imaging via magnetic resonance, could help improve outcomes from cell replacement therapies used for conditions such as liver disease or type 1 diabetes.

Cartoon showing nanoscale probe used to detect pH change caused by death of transplanted cell. (McMahon/Nature Materials)

Cartoon showing nanoscale probe used to detect pH change caused by death of transplanted cell. (McMahon/Nature Materials)

“This technology has the potential to turn the human body into less of a black box and tell us if transplanted cells are still alive,” says Mike McMahon, Ph.D., an associate professor of radiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine principal investigator on the study. “That information will be invaluable in fine-tuning therapies.”

Transplanted cells often fall victim to assault from the body’s immune system, which sees the news cells as foreign invaders. Says McMahon,  “once you put the cells in, you really have no idea how long they survive.”

When cells die there is a change in the acidity nearby. Using this fact, the researchers developed a nanoparticle sensor that could both sense the change in pH and be detected via MRI. The team tested the sensors on mice and found they they were able to track the location of surviving transplanted cells and determine the proportion that had survived.

“It was exciting to see that this works so well in a living body,” says research fellow Kannie Chan, Ph.D., the lead author on the study, which was published in Nature Materials. This should take a lot of the guesswork out of cell transplantation by letting doctors see whether the cells survive, and if not, when they die,” Chan says. “That way they may be able to figure out what’s killing the cells, and how to prevent it.”

Chan works in the laboratory of Jeff Bulte, Ph.D., the director of cellular imaging at Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Cell Engineering. Bulte and McMahon collaborated on the study. Additional authors include Guanshu Liu, Xiaolei Song, Heechul Kim, Tao Yu, Dian R. Arifin, Assaf A. Gilad, Justin Hanes, Piotr Walczak and Peter C. M. van Zijl, all of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. McMahan, Bulte, Gilad, Hanes and van Zijl are all affiliated faculty members of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology.

Funding for this study was provided by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (grant numbers R01 EB012590, EB015031, EB015032 and EB007825).

Follow this link to read the paper, MRI-detectable pH nanosensors incorporated into hydrogels for in vivo sensing of transplanted-cell viability, in Nature Materials online http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/nmat3525.html

FLC event focuses on Maryland technology

Screen Shot 2013-02-04 at 10.59.42 AMMaryland Technology Past, Present and Future is the topic of a day-long symposium, February 28 at the National Electronics Museum hosted by the Federal Laboratory Consortium Mid-Atlantic Region.

The FLC is a national organization chartered by Congress to foster technology transfer from federal research laboratories and field centers, to other federal agencies; state and local government; academia and the private sector. One of the regional consortium’s efforts has been to conduct a series of one-day forums that highlight specific areas of technology and encourage collaboration and partnership development with federal labs.

Registration is $25 and includes refreshments and lunch. Registration deadline is February 15 and can be made online at this link.

The National Electronics Museum is located at 1745 West Nursery Road in Linthicum, Md. The symposium begins with registration at 8:15 a.m. and adjourns at 3:45 p.m.

In addition to the presentations, the day will offer the opportunity to meet scientists from the regions National Labs such as NASA, NIST, NIH and Goddard as well as representatives of local industry. In addition to the FLC Mid-Atlantic Region, participating organizations for this symposium include Johns Hopkins University and TEDCO.

For further information or if you have difficulty accessing the registration site, please contact John Emond at 301-384-2809 or johnlamaremond@aol.com. You may also contact INBT’s director of corporate partnerships, Tom Fekete at 410-516-8891 or tmfeke@jhu.edu.

A flyer and agenda for the event are below:

Maryland Technology Day Agenda

Maryland Technology Day Flyer

RNA nanotechnology and therapeutics conference registration opens

Mark your calendar. Those affiliated with Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology or Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence may be interested to know that online registration is now open for the 2013 International Conference of RNA Nanotechnology and Therapeutics to be held in Lexington, KY on April 3-5, 2013 at the Crowne Plaza Hotel & Resorts.  The meeting is organized by Peixuan Guo (University of Kentucky CNPP), John Rossi (Beckman Research Institute), Bruce Shapiro (NCI), and Neocles Leontis (Bowling Green State University). Along with invited speakers, there will also be a poster session. Invited speakers are yet to be announced.

Program topics include:

  •  Biophysical and Single Molecule Approaches in RNA Nanotechnology
  • RNA Structure and Folding in Nanoparticles
  • RNA Computation and Modeling
  • RNA Nanoparticle Assembly
  • RNA Nanoparticles in Therapeutics
  • RNA Chemistry for Synthesis, Conjugation, & Labeling of Nanoparticles
  • RNA Systems Biology and Engineering
  • Exosomes and Extracellular RNA Communication

Additional details and registration information can be found at http://nanobio.uky.edu/RNA2013

 

Speakers confirmed for Oct. 24 INBT student symposium

Student-run symposiums are held in the fall and early spring.

Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence and Physical Science-Oncology Center are hosting a mini-symposium highlighting current research in these entities on Wednesday, October 24 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Clipper Room of Shriver Hall on the Homewood campus of Johns Hopkins University. In addition to student presenters, the symposium features a faculty expert speaker and invited guest lectures from the National Institutes of Health program managers for both the CCNEs and the PS-OCs.

Confirmed speakers include:
  • 10:00 am – 10:20 am Zachary Gagnon, assistant prof. of chemical and biomolecular engineering: “Nonlinear electrokinetics at microfluidic liquid/liquid interfaces
  • 10:20 am – 10:40 am Laura Ensign: Mucus-penetrating particles for vaginal drug delivery (CCNE)
  • 10:40 am – 11:00 am Wei-Chien Hung: alpha4-tail-mediated Rac1 and RhoA-myosin II in optimizing 2D versus confined migration (PS-OC)
  • 11:00 am – 11:20 am Iwen Wu: An adipose-derived biomaterial for soft tissue reconstruction (INBT)
  • 11:20 am – 11:50 pm Sean Hanlon: NCI Physical Science–Oncology Centers (PS-OC) Program, bringing a new perspective to cancer research
  • 11:50 am – 1:00 pm Break/Lunch
  • 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm David Weitz: Drop-based microfluidics: Biology one picoliter at a time (INBT)
  • 1:30 pm -2:00 pm Sara S. Hook, projects manager for the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer program within the Center for Strategic Scientific Initiatives (CSSI) at the National Cancer Institute
  • 2:00 pm – 2:20 pm Break
  • 2:20 pm – 2:40 pm Phrabha Raman: A microfluidic device to measure traction forces during confined cancer cell migration towards chemoattractant (PS-OC)
  • 2:40 pm – 3:00 pm Allison Chambliss: Single-cell epigenetics to retain cell morphology (PS-OC)
  • 3:00 pm – 3:20 pm Sravanti Kusuma: Tissue engineering approaches to study blood vessel growth (PS-OC)
  • 3:20 pm – 3:40 pm Benjamin Lin: Using synthetic spatial signaling perturbations to probe directed cell migration (INBT)
  • 3:40 pm – 4:00 pm Stephany Tzeng: Cancer-specific gene delivery to liver cell cultures using synthetic poly(beta-amino esters) (INBT)
  • 4:00 – 4:15 pm Brian Keeley: An epigenetic approach to assessing specificity and sensitivity of DNA methylation (CCNE)

The symposium talks are free and open to the Hopkins community as space allows.

 

 

DNA folded into shapes offers alternative gene delivery vehicle

DNA molecules (light green) packaged into nanoparticles of different shapes using a polymer with two different segments. Cartoon illustrations created by Wei Qu, Northwestern University and Martin Rietveld, Johns Hopkins /INBT. Microscopic images created by Xuan Jiang, Johns Hopkins University.

Using snippets of DNA as building blocks to create nanoscale rods, worms and spheres, researchers at Johns Hopkins and Northwestern universities have devised a means of delivering gene therapy that avoids some of the undesirable aspects of using viruses to deliver genes to treat disease. The shape and size of the DNA-based nanoparticle also affected how well the genes were delivered.

Worm shapes, for example, were particularly effective.

“The worm-shaped particles resulted in 1,600 times more gene expression in the liver cells than the other shapes,” said Hai-Quan Mao, an associate professor ofmaterials science and engineering in Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering. “This means that producing nanoparticles in this particular shape could be the more efficient way to deliver gene therapy to these cells.”

This study was published in the Oct. 12 online edition of Advanced Materials.

Initial funding for the research came from a seed grant provided by the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology, of which Mao is an affiliate. The Johns Hopkins-Northwestern partnership research was supported by a National Institutes of Health grant.

Read the entire Johns Hopkins press release by Phil Sneiderman (JHU) and Megan Fellman (Northwestern) here.

 

 

Konstantopoulos named BMES fellow

Konstantinos Konstantopoulos (Photo by Mary Spiro)

Konstantinos Konstantopoulos, professor and chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering has been named a Fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). Konstantopoulos was one of only nine fellows elected to the Society’s Class of 2012.

BMES states that Konstantopoulos received this honor in recognition of his “seminal bioengineering research contributions involving the discovery and characterization of novel selectin ligands expressed by metastatic tumor cells.”  Formal installation of fellows will take place at the BMES annual meeting  October 24-27 in Atlanta.

Konstantopoulos is an affiliated faculty member of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. He is also a project leader with the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center. Together with Martin Pomper, a School of Medicine professor of radiology and co-principal investigator of the Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Konstantopoulos is researching mechanochemical effects on metastasis.

Specifically, his work investigates the effects of fluid mechanical forces at different oxygen tension microenvironments on tumor cell signaling, adhesion and migration. Fluid flow in and around tumor tissue modulates the mechanical microenvironment, including the forces acting on the cell surface and the tethering force on cell-substrate connections. Cells in the interior of a tumor mass experience a lower oxygen tension microenvironment and lower fluid velocities than those at the edges in proximity with a functional blood vessel, and are prompted to produce different biochemical signals. These differential responses affect tumor cell fate that is, whether a cell will live or die, and whether it will be able to detach and migrate to secondary sites in the body.

According to the BMES website, members who demonstrate exceptional achievements and experience in the field of biomedical engineering, as well as a record of membership and participation in the Society, have the opportunity to become fellows. Fellows are selected and conferred  by the BMES board of directors through a highly selective process. Nominations for each of these categories may be made by Society members and the board of directors.

Learn more about research in the Konstantopoulos Lab here.

 

 

Coated nanoparticles move easily into brain tissue

Real-time imaging of nanoparticles green) coated with polyethylene-glycol (PEG), a hydrophilic, non-toxic polymer, penetrate within normal rodent brain. Without the PEG coating, negatively charged, hydrophobic particles (red) of a similar size do not penetrate. Image by Elizabeth Nance, Kurt Sailor, Graeme Woodworth.

Johns Hopkins researchers report they are one step closer to having a drug-delivery system flexible enough to overcome some key challenges posed by brain cancer and perhaps other maladies affecting that organ. In a report published online Aug. 29 in Science Translational Medicine, the Johns Hopkins team says its bioengineers have designed nanoparticles that can safely and predictably infiltrate deep into the brain when tested in rodent and human tissue.

“We are pleased to have found a way to prevent drug-embedded particles from sticking to their surroundings so that they can spread once they are in the brain,” said Justin Hanes, Lewis J. Ort Professor of Ophthalmology and project leader in the Johns Hopkins Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence.

Standard protocols following the removal of brain tumors include chemotherapy directly applied to the surgical site to kill any cancer cells left behind. This method, however, is only partially effective because it is hard to administer a dose of chemotherapy high enough to sufficiently penetrate the tissue to be effective and low enough to be safe for the patient and healthy tissue. Furthermore, previous versions of drug-loaded nanoparticles typically adhere to the surgical site and do not penetrate into the tissue.

These newly engineered nanoparticles overcome this challenge. Elizabeth Nance, a graduate student in chemical and biomolecular engineering, and Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon Graeme Woodworth, suspected that drug penetration might be improved if drug-delivery nanoparticles interacted minimally with their surroundings. Nance achieved this by coating nano-scale beads with a dense layer of PEG or poly(ethylene glycol). The team then injected the coated beads, which had been marked with a fluorescent tag,  into slices of rodent and human brain tissue. They found that a dense coating of PEG allowed larger beads to penetrate the tissue, even those beads that were nearly twice the size previously thought to be the maximum possible for penetration within the brain. They then tested these beads in live rodent brains and found the same results.

Elizabeth Nance. Photo by Ming Yang.

The results were similar when biodegradable nanoparticles carrying the chemotherapy drug paclitaxel and coated with PEG were used. “It’s really exciting that we now have particles that can carry five times more drug, release it for three times as long and penetrate farther into the brain than before,” said Nance. “The next step is to see if we can slow tumor growth or recurrence in rodents.”

Woodworth added that the team “also wants to optimize the particles and pair them with drugs to treat other brain diseases, like multiple sclerosis, stroke, traumatic brain injury, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.” Another goal for the team is to be able to administer their nanoparticles intravenously, which is research they have already begun.

Additional authors on the paper include Kurt Sailor, Ting-Yu Shih, Qingguo Xu, Ganesh Swaminathan, Dennis Xiang, and Charles Eberhart, all from The Johns Hopkins University.

Story adapted from an original press release by Cathy Kolf.

 

Additional news coverage of this research can be found at the following links:

Nanotechnology/Bio & Medicine

Death and Taxes Mag

New Scientist Health

Nanotech Web

Portugese news release (in Portugese)

German Public Radio (in German)

Roundup of research by INBT’s summer undergraduate researchers

Eric Do with his mentor Jose Luis Santos in the Herrera-Alonso lab. (Photo by Mary Spiro)

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology hosted 17 undergraduates from universities nationwide in to conduct research in Hopkins laboratories. Of the total, three students were affiliated with the Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence (CCNE), four were affiliated with the Physical Sciences-Oncology Center (PS-OC), and the remaining 10 were funded in part by the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates program. INBT, served as a hub for their academic and social activities.

INBT summer interns conduct 10 weeks of research in a laboratory either on the Homewood or the medical campus of the University. At the end of that time, students have learned how to work in a multidisciplinary team and how to manage a short term research project. They also discover if research is a pathway they want to pursue after earning their bachelor’s degrees. Students also present their work in a university wide poster session.

So what were our summer visitors doing? Here are short summaries of the research conducted by each student.

Amani Alkayyali (Wayne State Univeristy)

Lab: Honggang Cui, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, REU

Amani tried different concentrations of two different peptide conjugates toward the creation of a self-assembling nano-filament that would remain outside of blood cells yet become part of a hemoglobin-based drug delivery vehicle.

Jacqueline Carozza (Cornell University)

Lab: Denis Wirtz, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, PS-OC

Jacqueline used high throughput cell phenotyping techniques developed in the Wirtz lab to investigate the physical differences in a variety of cancer cell lines in response to varying concentrations of the cancer drug doxorubicin.

Eric Do (University of Washington, Seattle)

Lab: Margarita Herrera-Alonso, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, REU

Eric worked on developing nanoparticles that could encapsulate semiconducting polymers, which have been shown to have a lower toxicity to cells than quantum dots, for the purpose of developing a safer in vivo fluorescent imaging technology.

Matthew Fong (University of California, Berkeley)

Lab: Honggang Cui, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, CCNE

Matthew worked on pairing the chemotherapy drug Paclitaxel with a vesicle engineered of a peptide amphiphile to create a 3D nanostructure that would improve the drugs solubility and control the timed release of the drug.

Olivia Hentz, right, with mentor Ellen Benn in the Erlebacher lab. (Photo by Mary Spiro)

Olivia Hentz (Cornell University)

Lab: Jonah Erlebacher, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, REU

Olivia used gold as a template to create hollow polymer nanoparticles in both spherical and rod shapes and examined their ability to transfect gene-silencing RNA into living cells under various conditions.

Michelle LaComb (Rice University)

Lab: Honggang Cui, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, REU

Michelle studied the self-assembly patterns of folic acid, an essential vitamin to humans, in various solutions. Cancer cells often express a high number of folic acid receptors, so folic acid could play a role in targeted cancer therapies.

Bianca Lascano (Norfolk State University)

Lab: Jordan Green, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, REU

Bianca conducted in vitro tests on a library of poly beta-amino esters for their ability to non-virally transfect a fluorescent reporter gene into a dendritic cell.

Lauren Lee (Cornell University)

Lab: Hai-Quan Mao, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, REU

Lauren tested the migration response of immortalized Schwann cells growing within an engineered hydrogel containing neurotrophic growth factors positioned along a physical and chemical gradient.

Anthony Loder (Rowan State University)

Lab: Xin Chen, Dept. of Biology. REU

Using stem cells from Drosophila, Anthony looked at the differentiation and proliferation and examined how Enhancer of Zeste histone methyl-transferase was involved in regulating the process.

Cassandra “Casie” Loren (Oregon State University)

Lab: Denis Wirtz, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, PS-OC

Casie used high throughput cell phenotyping techniques developed in the Wirtz lab to examine the physical characteristics of cells growing through various life cycle stages, particularly quiescence or cell inactivity.

Albert Lu (University of California, Berkeley)

Lab: Jeff Wang, Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, CCNE

Albert used E. coli to perform limit-of-detection evaluations of a lab-on-a-chip device designed to quickly screen for pathogens in biological samples.

Bria Macklin and her mentor, Sravanti Kusuma. (Photo by Mary Spiro)

Bria Macklin (Howard University)

Lab: Sharon Gerecht, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, REU

With various growth factors, Bria optimized a collagen-based medium in which to grow endothelial cells.

Daniel McClelland (Bethany College)

Lab: D. Howard Fairbrother, Dept. of Chemistry, REU

Daniel tested the effect of carbon nanotube-polymer composites on the biofilm attachment and viability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a common soil and water. The study related to the biodegradation of carbon nanotubes.

Edwin “Charlie” Nusbaum (The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey)

Lab: Robert Ivkov, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, REU

Hyperthermia, or heating cells above normal body temperatures, could be used in cancer treatment, but heat to surrounding healthy tissues and organs would be detrimental. Charlie showed that copper could be used to calibrate alternating magnetic field hypothermia with magnetic nanoparticles at radiofrequencies.

Josh Porterfield (Cornell University)

Lab: Sharon Gerecht, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, PS-OC

Josh studied the influence of a transcription factor associated with the formation of blood vessels in breast cancer tumors called HEYL on the patterns of vascularization in extracellular matrix.

Justin Samorajski (University of Dallas)

Lab: Peter Searson, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, CCNE

Using a two-layer microfluidic device, Justin examined the effect of an electrical field gradient on the migration of fibrosarcoma cells in 3D.

Carolyn Zhang (University of California, San Diego)

Lab: Sharon Gerecht/Hai Quan Mao, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, PS-OC

Constructing a framework from fibrin developed in the Mao lab, Carolyn worked on optimizing a template containing a growth factor gradient upon which endothelial colony forming cells could establish a tubular structure of viable cells.

Story by Mary Spiro

 

Related links:

Meet INBT’s summer interns, already digging into their research – 06/28/12

Summer interns present research work at Aug. 2 poster session

Nanobio REU program