Regenerative medicine theme of science-writer bootcamp

Screen Shot 2013-04-01 at 3.19.05 PMJohns Hopkins invites you to the fifth annual science-writer boot camp. This year’s topic will be Regenerative Medicine. Join Johns Hopkins experts in regenerative medicine to learn the latest in stem cell research, tissue regeneration and organ transplantation.

Three of the 11 presenters are affiliated faculty members of the Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology. This event is sponsored by the Johns Hopkins Institute for Basic Biomedical Sciences.  There is no cost but reservations are required. Working press as well as freelance writers are invited to attend.

WHAT: Body Building: Recent Advances in Regenerative Medicine

WHEN: Monday, April 29, 2011, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. (lunch will be provided)

WHERE: Bernstein-Offit Building, room LL7, Johns Hopkins SAIS Campus, 1717 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, D.C. 20036

RSVP: Vanessa McMains at vmcmain1@jhmi.edu or 410-502-9410 by April 19

Confirmed speakers:

  • Gerald Brandacher, M.D. Scientific Director, Composite Tissue Allotransplantation (Reconstructive Transplant) Program
  • Robert Brodsky, M.D. Director, Division of Hematology
  • Jeff Bulte, Ph.D. Director, Cellular Imaging Section, Institute for Cell Engineering (INBT affiliated faculty)
  • Mark Donowitz, M.D. Director, Center for Epithelial Disorders; Director, Conte GI Core Research Center
  • Gary Gerstenblith, M.D. Professor, Medicine
  • Warren Grayson, Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering (INBT affiliated faculty)
  • Jun Liu, Ph.D. Professor, Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences
  • Erika Matunis, Ph.D. Associate Professor, Cell Biology
  • Guo-li Ming, M.D., Ph.D. Professor, Neurology and member of the Institute for Cell Engineering (INBT affiliated faculty)
  • Ronald Schnaar, Ph.D. Professor, Pharmacology and Molecular Sciences; Director, Lung Inflammatory Disease Program of Excellence in Glycoscience

We look forward to seeing you on April 29!

Download the color flyer here.

 

INBT Seminar Aug. 22: New Questions in Aging

Everyone ages; it’s a fact. But as we age, must we also get sick? Scientists, engineers and clinicians are studying how cells change as we age. What they learn may help prevent the onset of disease.

Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will host a half-day seminar “New Questions in Aging,” Aug. 22 from 10 a.m. until noon in the Hackerman Hall Auditorium (B-17).

Speakers include experts in the field of aging research.

Felipe Sierra

Felipe Sierra, PhD is director of the National Institute of Aging Division of Aging Biology at the National Institutes of Health. He will present the talk “Geroscience: Aging as the Major Risk Factor for Chronic Disease”  from 10-10:45 a.m.

Denis Wirtz, PhD, is the Theophilus H. Smoot Professor in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Johns Hopkins University and director of the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center. His talk is entitled “Single Cell Phenotyping for Studies in Aging;” 10:45 -11:00 a.m.

Denis Wirtz

Jeremy Walston, MD, is the Raymond and Anna Lublin Professor of Geriatric Medicine from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology. His talk is entitled “A Biological Platform for Chronic Disease and Late Life Decline;” 11:00 to 11:15.

Questions and discussion on this interesting topic will follow the talks. This seminar is free and open to the entire Hopkins community. Faculty, students and staff are encouraged to attend for any or all portions of this seminar. For further information about the Johns Hopkins Physical Sciences-Oncology Center, go to http://psoc.inbt.jhu.edu/about/

Jeremy Walston

The Institute for NanoBioTechnology at Johns Hopkins University brings together 223 researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, School of Medicine, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Whiting School of Engineering to create new knowledge and new technologies at the interface of nanoscience and medicine.

 

INBT professional development seminar topics announced

Every summer, Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology hosts a series of free professional development seminars for the Hopkins community. Seminars will be held from 10:45 a.m. to noon on the second and fourth Wednesdays in June and July in Shaffer 3 (the basement auditorium). Dates and topics are as follows:

  • June 13:  How to promote yourself and the benefits of networking with Tom Fekete, INBT’s director of Corporate Partnerships.
  • June 27:  Why should you consider grad school and how do you prepare? The speaker is Christine Kavanaugh, Assistant Director of Graduate Admissions, Communications and Enrollment for Johns Hopkins University.
  • July 11: I got my PhD, now what?  This will be a panel discussion about various career pathways post graduate school, including  entrepreneurship and working in academia or the government. Panel participants will be Shyam Khatau, PhD (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering JHU); Stephen Diegelmann, PhD (Chemistry, JHU now working at Case Western Reserve University); and Nicole Moore, ScD (Program Manager in the Office of Physical Sciences-Oncology at NIH/ NCI).
  • July 25: INBT Student Film Festival. This seminar will premiere the films made by students in the Science Communications for Scientists and Engineers course taught by Mary Spiro, INBT’s science writer.

 

It’s a small world: Micro/nanotechnology in regenerative medicine and cancer

Sageeta Bhatia

Nanotechnology, regenerative medicine and cancer will be the topic of a special biomedical engineering seminar on March 6 at 3 p.m. in the Darner Conference Room, Ross Building, Room G007 at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Speaker Sangeeta Bhatia, MD, PhD, director, of the Laboratory for Multiscale Regenerative Technologies at Massachusetts Institute of Technology will present “It’s a small world: Micro/Nanotechnology in Regenerative Medicine and Cancer. ” She will discuss the role of micro and nanotechnology for mimicking, monitoring and perturbing the tissue microenvironment.

“I will present our work on reconstructing normal liver microenvironments using microtechnology, biomaterials and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as our work on normalizing diseased cancer microenvironments using both inorganic and organic nano materials,” Bhatia noted in an announcement.  Bhatia is a professor of Health Sciences and Technology and professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT.

The talk is hosted by associate professor of Materials Science and Engineering and affiliated faculty member of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology Hai-Quan Mao. The event is free and open to the Johns Hopkins Community. Refreshments will be served.

 

 

Hopkins faculty to present at American Society for NanoMedicine meeting

© Liudmila Gridina | Dreamstime.com

The American Society for NanoMedicine (ASNM) will hold its third annual meeting November 9 -11 at the Universities at Shady Grove Conference Center in Gaithersburg, Md. This year ASNM has worked closely with the Cancer Imaging Program, National Cancer Institute, and National Institutes of Health to create a conference with a special focus on nano-enabeled cancer diagnostics and therapies, and the synergy of the combination of nano-improved imaging modalities and targeted delivery.

The program also focuses on updates on the newest Food and Drug Administration, nanotoxicity, nanoparticle characterization, nanoinformatics, nano-ontology, results of the latest translational research and clinical trials in nanomedicine, and funding initiatives. This year’s keynote speaker is Roger Tsien, 2008 Nobel Prize Laureate. Numerous other speakers and breakout sessions are planned for the three day event. Two speakers affiliated with Johns Hopkins include Justin Hanes and Dmitri Artemov. Hanes is a professor of nanomedicine in the department of ophthalmology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Artemov is an associate professor of radiology/magnetic resonance imaging research, also at the School of Medicine.

The deadline for the poster abstracts is October 1. The top four posters submitted by young (pre and post doctoral) investigators will be selected to give a short 10-minute (eight slides) oral presentation on November 11.

ASNM describes itself as a “a non-profit, open, democratic and transparent professional society…focus(ing) on cutting-edge research in nanomedicine and moving towards realizing the potential of nanomedicine for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease.” More information about the ASNM can be found on the Society’s official website.

 

 

Nanobio postdocs offer trusted tips on getting grant money

Photo illustration by Mary Spiro.

Three postdoctoral fellows from Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology will offer a one-hour crash course in how to get those research dollars; July 27, 11 a.m. Krieger 205. Free for Hopkins community.

Funding dollars make the research world go ‘round. Few know that better than postdoctoral fellows, who would be out of work without it. As part of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s last professional development seminar of the summer, three INBT affiliated postdoctoral fellows will offer their sage advice on preparing winning research grants.

Topics to be covered on the basic aspects of grant writing include:

  • knowing when to write a grant
  • identifying funding sources
  • planning a timeline
  • how to structure a competitive proposal
  • do’s and dont’s of grant writing and planning
  • basic science writing tips for conveying ideas clearly and succinctly

This seminar will be led by Eric Balzer, postdoctoral fellow with professor Konstantinos Konstantopoulos (ChemBE); Yanique Rattigan, postdoctoral fellow with professor Anirban Maitra (Oncology/Pathology); and Daniele Gilkes, postdoctoral fellow with professor Denis Wirtz (ChemBE).

For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.

 

 

 

 

Becton Dickinson leader to discuss medical device development

Adam Steel (Becton Dickinson)

INBT hosts a talk on medical device development from Becton Dickinson systems integration director Adam Steel, July 13, 11 a.m. in Krieger 205. Free to Hopkins community.

Adam Steel, PhD, Director of Systems Engineering at Becton Dickinson, will discuss medical device development as part of Johns Hopkins Institute for NanoBioTechnology’s professional development seminars, Wednesday July 13 at 11 a.m. in Krieger 205.

Dr. Steel joined BD in 2005. Previously he was vice president of research and development at MetriGenix. He earned his PhD in analytical chemistry at the University of Maryland College Park and undergraduate degrees in chemistry and mathematics from Gettysburg College. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship in medical device development at the National Institutes of Standards and Technology.

This talk is the third installment in INBT’s free, summer professional development seminar series. Topics are geared toward undergraduate and graduate students.

The final seminar will be held July 27 on the topic of the grant submission process and how to obtain funding for research. For additional information on INBT’s professional development seminar series, contact Ashanti Edwards, INBT’s Academic Program Administrator at Ashanti@jhu.edu.